February 2019 | Moss Vale Aquatic Centre

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February 25, 2019

Moss Vale War Memorial Aquatic Centre is proud to have taken part in the 2019 NSW Seniors Festival that took place last week.

The staff at the Centre came along and supported Love your Life! – Leisure and Travel Expo at Mittagong RSL, speaking to visitors about the social and wellness benefits of keeping active.
We also conducted a free come and try Aqua Class on Wednesday 20th February, with over 20 participants that had not experienced the benefits of water exercises before.
The festival was a great success and we are looking forward to taking part next year!

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February 25, 2019
Check out below some great full body exercise tips by our member Nathalia and trainer Rob.

Four Benefits of Total Body Workouts

  • Total body training improves workout efficiency by minimizing the fluff to get you strong and muscular in a hurry
  • You’ll hit major movement patterns multiple times per week in a variety of intensities and rep ranges to stimulate the most number of muscle fibers
  • When in a time-crunch, total body training is best for making huge strength gains when you’re short on time.
  • To simplify getting Strong, Lean, and Muscular.

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February 25, 2019

Carbohydrates are the major and primary fuel source for muscles and the brain. Carbohydrates are broken down into glucose which is the form that is used for energy by the body.

Carbohydrate foods include starchy foods like bread, rice, pasta, noodles, potato, corn, legumes, biscuits and cereals and all sugars including natural sugars found in fruit, milk andyoghurt.

Carbohydrates are stored in the muscles and liver and must be constantly replaced. Spreading small amounts of carbohydrates are a helpful way to provide the body with adequate stores without consuming excessive amounts. This can be achieved by consuming three small meals.

Healthy snacks may be beneficial to prevent excessive hunger between meals. By eating this way you will get smaller rises in your blood sugar levels over a longer period of time so that you are using the maximum amount though out the day, limiting excess building up and becoming stored in the body.

Do not skip meals is not ideal as it often results in food cravings and binge eating.


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February 24, 2019
You’ve signed up for swimming, gotten the kids ready, packed the car, brought a change of clothes and even packed their favourite treats only to arrive at the pool with a screaming inconsolable child that is too scared to swim. Many of us have been there, it can be tough. Here are some helpful tips to get your child to love the water!
Understanding where the fear comes from
In young children, fear is often related to developmental advances that give kids a new (but not always realistic) awareness of potential dangers. As they pass different developmental milestones they develop fears based on their perception of danger, reality and imagination.
Couple this with a bad experience can lead to a prolonged period of fear. A slip in the tub that momentarily dunked his face in the water or a loud motorboat that startled him at the beach can spook a child for months afterward.
Tips for Overcoming the fear?
  • Always take your child’s fear seriously but don’t overreact or overdramatise it.
  • Praise and encourage your child when he tries to overcome fear. Express confidence he will eventually succeed.
  • Find ways to break the feared experience into small, manageable steps eg. practice “swimming” in the bath, dip feet and toys into the toddler pool until they are comfortable.
  • Give your child frequent reassurance she is safe. One technique to try is for you to go into the water and have your child throw a toy at you. You then bring the toy to the pool edge and continue this activity to reassure them that its safe and you will guide them back to the pool edge.
  • Find storybooks that discuss the fear to read with your child. EG. Peppa and George Go Swimming,
  • Familiarise your child with the pool before starting lessons and keep pool sessions short. Start with 5-10 minutes if your child really isn’t comfortable and slowly increase them over time.
  • Get the right equipment- Whether its Batman swimmers, Peppa Pig goggles, bath toys or floaties. Make sure you are equipped to give them the best possible experience. Just remember that floaties can provide a false sense of security to and are in no way a good substitute for actually being able to swim —  so keep your little one at arm’s length whether she’s wearing a flotation aid or not.
  • If getting their face wet is the issue, dip a cloth or sponge in the pool and dab one another’s face so they can get used to the wetness. Have them bring a handful of water up to her mouth and blow bubbles. Blow a rubber duck across the surface, slowly working on getting the face closer to the water.
  • Be patient. Respect that your child is genuinely fearful and don’t force them to go any faster than they are able. Try each of these activities as many times as necessary until your child become comfortable
  • Do not wait until your child gets older to teach them to swim. Fear does not necessarily diminish with age. Safe and positive exposure to the water will help diminish the fear
  • Make it fun!
  • Stay positive, be patient and don’t give up. While it can be disheartening to feel like the only parent with a screaming child, most of us have been there. Keep taking small steps towards the goal of swimming!